Bygholm 1
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Denmark's oldest burial mounds

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Denmark's oldest burial mounds were constructed in the late Neolithic Era, circa 3800 BC They resembled the longhouses inhabited by the living and some were more than 80 metres long. As part of the funeral rites, 'houses of the dead', facades and wooden …

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Four adults and a teenager

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A recent excavation of the oldest long barrow at the site revealed the remains of a 13-15-year-old boy. He was presumably killed by the flint arrow found at the chest region, and it is thought this may have been his home. The centre of the long barrow also contained a wooden coffin resting on stones and containing the cremated skeletons of four adults, interred in pairs, their feet facing each other. They had no grave goods with them. As part of the burials, which were carried out at almost the same time, ritual meals were also held. The remains of a meal were found near two of the small tombs, which were also located within the oval area of the long barrow. Shortly after the burials, the area was covered by the large long barrow and surrounded by kerbstones.

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Four adults and a teenager

A recent excavation of the oldest long barrow at the site revealed the remains of a 13-15-year-old …

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