Gammellund
Facts

From earthworks to earthenware

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The road to Hestør Odde, at the southern tip of the island of Mors, passes an earthworks known as Gammellund. On the southern mound was once a farm, and on the northern mound a castle, and the whole site is surrounded by a moat. Later the farm became a manor housing…

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Peg-leg's pipe-dream

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Time / Periode 1774
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The owner of the Gammellund estate went by the name of Thomas Pileben, in reference to his wooden leg, which stuck out when he rode horseback. Thomas Thomsen Lund (his real name) was perhaps a tyrannical squire. Rumour has it that his ghost rides the stretch between the Lund estate and Øster Assels. But the landowner was nothing if not enterprising. In 1774, he founded Morsø Fabrikken which produced the decorated and glazed earthenware known as faience. The factory made the finest tray tables, dinner services and jugs imaginable. The senior employees at the factory also liked to glaze the tips of their clay pipes so they didn't stick to the lips. Thomas Pileben was an early trend-spotter. Tables exquisitely laid out with porcelain and fine earthenware were high fashion among the nobility and well-to-do in the 1700s.

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Peg-leg's pipe-dream

The owner of the Gammellund estate went by the name of Thomas Pileben, in reference to his wooden…

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