Jægersborg Hegn. Gravhøj med guldskive.
Facts

Bronze Age landscape still exists

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Bronze Age burial mounds are scattered throughout the large Dyrehaven park. In the forests near the amusement park, by the palace and dotted about individually and in groups. The landscape surrounding the Eremitage Palace is also interesting because is clearly…

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The King's last excavation

Time / Periode -1800 -500
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Shovel-happy King Frederik VII organised a number of archaeological excavations. And in 1863 he made his best find, at Jægersborg Hegn. One grave contained a 23-centimetre sun disc – once carried at sacred Bronze Age rituals. The King was so totally absorbed by the find that he refused to leave the site - even when the King of Greece came to visit. But duty soon came calling. A few days later, he was forced to leave Zealand to inspect the troops on manoeuvres in South Jutland near another ancient construction called Dannevirke Rampart. A war with Germany was on the cards. While in South Jutland, the King also visited archaeological excavations in Nydam Bog in October. Soon after, he contracted a fever and died on 15 November 1863 at Glücksborg Castle.

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The King's last excavation

Shovel-happy King Frederik VII organised a number of archaeological excavations. And in 1863 he…

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