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The three field kilns at Birkesig blend modestly into the landscape. Designed for burning limestone into quicklime for use in building mortar, the brick-built kilns are half-bowl shaped, with characteristic chimneys. In front of the kilns is a covered shed store.…

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How was lime burnt in the kilns?

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Time / Periode 1920 1930
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The kilns may be charming landscape features, but how do they actually work? There are still people around who know. As recently as 1981, lime was burnt in another field kiln at Birkesig. As periodic kilns, they were allowed to cool from one firing to the next. First, the kiln is filled with limestone mixed with coal. The aperture is then bricked in and the kiln is fired. For five or six days, the kiln burns around the clock. After cooling, the burnt stone is removed and stored in the small shed. The technique dates back to the Middle Ages in Denmark, and these small field kilns – that are relatively new – exemplify an ancient technique and tradition.

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How was lime burnt in the kilns?

The kilns may be charming landscape features, but how do they actually work? There are still people…

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