Lusehøj
Facts

Final resting place of wealthy merchant

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The mighty Lusehøj on Southwest Funen was erected as a tomb for a very distinguished and powerful person – perhaps a king. Burial gifts of both bronze and gold accompanied the occupant on his journey to the eternal land of the dead. The gifts highlight the high…

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King rakes over the past

Time / Periode 1861 1977
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Lusehøj is a truly royal burial mound. It was excavated and investigated in 1861 at the request of King Frederik VII, who was interested in archaeology. The treasure and symbols of the past discovered made quite a stir and added extra sparkle to the King's archaeological collection. But the excavation was heavy handed and incomplete. A new investigation was therefore initiated in 1973-75. The archaeologists found artefacts including broken wine bottles from the King's excavation a good century before. Lusehøj was also confirmed as the final resting place of a uniquely wealthy chieftain. Surprisingly, the name Lusehøj is not related to the Danish words luset" (mean or lousy) or "lus" (lice). No, the burial mound is anything but shabby. The name is based on the Danish word "lys" meaning light. "

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King rakes over the past

Lusehøj is a truly royal burial mound. It was excavated and investigated in 1861 at the request of…

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