Moltkes Palæ
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Denmark's first public museum

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The palace on the corner of Bredgade and Dronningens Tværgade in Copenhagen dates back to 1702. It was built by King Christian V's half-brother, Ulrik Frederik Gyldenløve, who lived in the palace that is now called Charlottenborg until 1699. The architect was…

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Kidnapping means out for the count

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Time / Periode 1702
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In 1765, Moltke's Palace was the setting for a risqué kidnapping. Back then, the palace was owned by footloose and fancy-free Admiral Christian Conrad Danneskiold-Laurvig. He was something of a libertine: A wastrel with a taste for women who squandered his fortune away in just a few years. While at the theatre on Kongens Nytorv, he caught sight of a pretty, very young actress called Mette Marie Rose. One night after a performance, the count laid in wait, kidnapped her, whisked her off to his palace and held her captive. The affair whipped up quite a storm. The father protested to the king, who very reluctantly had to make an example of the culprit: He demanded the release of the actress and the count had to pay her compensation. He was then banished to Norway.

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Kidnapping means out for the count

In 1765, Moltke's Palace was the setting for a risqué kidnapping. Back then, the palace was…

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